The NYU professor and best-selling author makes his case for a radical rethinking of approaches to global development.

Brazilian Economy in the News

The last week saw a number of interesting articles discussing Brazil´s place  as the B among the BRIC countries. Here are two:

1.) “In an unusually pleasant slowdown, the unemployment rate is still at a record low, wages have risen, and more than 1 million jobs have been created this year.“
Brazil’s economic slowdown so far leaves many unscathed - latimes.com

2. “Maybe we just focus on the RIC countries. While we’re at it, Russia and India may not be so significant either.“
Brazil´s Influence is Nominal, at Best

BONUS- Brazilian President, Dilma discusses the Brazilian tax system.

3.“It’s unacceptable that Brazil, which has one of the most solid and lucrative financial systems, continues having one of the highest interest rates in the world.“
Rousseff Takes on the Infamous “ Brazil Coast“

5th UN World Conference on Women

                              

“We support holding the 5th UN World Conference on Women and call upon our own UN ambassador and those of member states in the General Assembly to pass the 5WCW resolution needed to hold it in 2015. We want 5WCW to address new and emerging issues affecting women and girls since the Beijing Conference in 1995, to build upon and not re-open previous UN documents.”

Brazil As An Emerging Donor: OverviewThe majority of my blogging about Brazil has focused on reforms in the education system. This change is of course indicative of greater strides the country has been making in repositioning itself as an emerging global leader.
I have a particular interest in sustainable development so I thought I would take a step back from education in order to examine Brazil´s new position as donor rather then recipient.There has been a recent shift in Brazilian thinking from viewing itself as a recipient of expertise and aid to one of offering support to other national efforts. Brazil has a broad history of creative problem solving in difficult situations which makes it well positioned to understand development work. Social inclusion with a focus on the environment seem to be the underlining themes of Brazil´s approach to development work.To get a good sense of Brazil´s recent growth let´s take a look at Brazil´s contributions to international and regional development.International Relations ( South-South relations)2005 Brazil contributed US $ 158 million2009 Brazil contributed US $362 million

The growth seen from 2005 to 2009 is largely an influence of Lula´s administration and his focus on improving South-South relations. Brazil seems to see itself more as a partnership builder rather then a donor. Brazilian aid in the early 2000´s was southern oriented and based on demand. Another distinguishing feature of Brazil´s emerging donor status is its approach to development;it has preferred to disseminate knowledge and training in order to build human resources in recipient countries rather then give cash.

In 2009 Brazil was ahead of China, Russia and Mexico in it´s contributions to international organizations, regional banks, peacekeepers ( Haiti), funds to the World Bank, International Development of America Bank and African Development Bank.Brazil has had rapid growth in bilateral humanitarian aid for emergency assistance, especially food and medicine.
2005: US $ 750,000
2009: US $ 43.5 million
The majority of this aid went to Cuba, Haiti and Honduras.The Brazilian National Development Bank offers financing to governments who contract Brazilian companies for large scale infrastructure programs.
2008: US $204 million
2009: US $ 860 million
Interestingly enough aside from multilateral contributions, humanitarian aid, and some foreign student assistance, only 5.5 %-13.5% of the annual Brazilian development assistance actually represents technical cooperation projects. These projects best highlight Brazil’s unique `solidarity diplomacy`.
More then 100 federal organizations have been involved in lending expertise for technical cooperation projects with most of the costs being absorbed by the agencies.Brazil is focused on passing on its innovation and expertise to other countries as seen by the 300 + on-going or recently finished projects, examples include replications of Brazil´s AIDS programs and agricultural knowledge dissemination.Overall Brazil has had two main phases to it´s technical cooperation projects with the first set focusing on Africa. Guinea, Mozambique, Zambia and 8 West African countries of The Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS). Most of Brazil´s support has focused on supporting national efforts for the introduction of biofuels.
The second cluster of projects are with the Americas and focus on the exchange of research and information for environmental protection and biofuels.In the last 10 years Brazil has greatly expanded its development assistance for other countries. Technical cooperation projects use to form the bulk of Brazil´s assistance projects and served to introduce Brazil´s solidarity diplomacy to the world. More and more we will see the importance of Brazil as a contributor to the global common good, such a achieving the United Nations Millennium Development Goals.

Brazil As An Emerging Donor: Overview

The majority of my blogging about Brazil has focused on reforms in the education system. This change is of course indicative of greater strides the country has been making in repositioning itself as an emerging global leader.

I have a particular interest in sustainable development so I thought I would take a step back from education in order to examine Brazil´s new position as donor rather then recipient.

There has been a recent shift in Brazilian thinking from viewing itself as a recipient of expertise and aid to one of offering support to other national efforts. Brazil has a broad history of creative problem solving in difficult situations which makes it well positioned to understand development work. Social inclusion with a focus on the environment seem to be the underlining themes of Brazil´s approach to development work.

To get a good sense of Brazil´s recent growth let´s take a look at Brazil´s contributions to international and regional development.

International Relations ( South-South relations)
2005 Brazil contributed US $ 158 million
2009 Brazil contributed US $362 million

The growth seen from 2005 to 2009 is largely an influence of Lula´s administration and his focus on improving South-South relations. Brazil seems to see itself more as a partnership builder rather then a donor. Brazilian aid in the early 2000´s was southern oriented and based on demand. Another distinguishing feature of Brazil´s emerging donor status is its approach to development;it has preferred to disseminate knowledge and training in order to build human resources in recipient countries rather then give cash.

In 2009 Brazil was ahead of China, Russia and Mexico in it´s contributions to international organizations, regional banks, peacekeepers ( Haiti), funds to the World Bank, International Development of America Bank and African Development Bank.

Brazil has had rapid growth in bilateral humanitarian aid for emergency assistance, especially food and medicine.

  • 2005: US $ 750,000
  • 2009: US $ 43.5 million


The majority of this aid went to Cuba, Haiti and Honduras.

The Brazilian National Development Bank offers financing to governments who contract Brazilian companies for large scale infrastructure programs.

  • 2008: US $204 million
  • 2009: US $ 860 million


Interestingly enough aside from multilateral contributions, humanitarian aid, and some foreign student assistance, only 5.5 %-13.5% of the annual Brazilian development assistance actually represents technical cooperation projects. These projects best highlight Brazil’s unique `solidarity diplomacy`.

More then 100 federal organizations have been involved in lending expertise for technical cooperation projects with most of the costs being absorbed by the agencies.

Brazil is focused on passing on its innovation and expertise to other countries as seen by the 300 + on-going or recently finished projects, examples include replications of Brazil´s AIDS programs and agricultural knowledge dissemination.

Overall Brazil has had two main phases to it´s technical cooperation projects with the first set focusing on Africa. Guinea, Mozambique, Zambia and 8 West African countries of
The Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS). Most of Brazil´s support has focused on supporting national efforts for the introduction of biofuels.


The second cluster of projects are with the Americas and focus on the exchange of research and information for environmental protection and biofuels.

In the last 10 years Brazil has greatly expanded its development assistance for other countries. Technical cooperation projects use to form the bulk of Brazil´s assistance projects and served to introduce Brazil´s solidarity diplomacy to the world. More and more we will see the importance of Brazil as a contributor to the global common good, such a achieving the United Nations Millennium Development Goals.

Pacific Civil Society Releases Rio+20 Statement: The Future We Demand!

Pacific Civil Society Organisations have released an urgent appeal to member states attending the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable  Development in June 2012.

‘The Future We Demand’ is signed by local, national and regional organisations and networks and allies, including Pacific Network on Globalisation, Fiji Women’s Rights Movement, Pacific Conference of Churches, and DAWN.

The statement calls for strong political leadership, and urgent action toward real and transformative solutions. The statement reaffirms the Rio Principles and Agenda 21, and highlights the fragility and resilience of Pacific island states, and a strong call for results at Rio:

"The future that the peoples of the Pacific demand in solidarity with others around the world, is one of social justice and human rights for all, and a recognition of the need to balance the three pillars of sustainable development– environmental, social and economic sustainability."

Support the Pacific statement. Sign on at: noelenen@gmail.com by May 31, 2012.

Read and download a pdf copy the Pacific statement at www.dawnnet.org/advocacy-appeals.php?signon=203&id=203